loader image

How We

Create Impact.

Meals Distributed

Toys & Supplies Distributed

Volunteer Hours

Program Volunteers

Weekly Shows

Social Media Membership

Program Mentees

Reentry Participants

I was raised in San Francisco’s District 10 in Bayview Hunters Point and attended SF Public schools (McAteer High School). After high school, I studied as a Journeymen Heating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Service Mechanic through City College of San Francisco and Local 38’s apprenticeship program.

Growing up, I watched my community endure a number of social challenges as a result of limited resources available. Violence, homelessness, incarceration, and gentrification plagued my neighborhood. At just eighteen years old, I made a conscious decision to help by joining Alive and Free Omega Boys Club and became an activist for my community. For the last twenty-four years, I have committed myself to inspiring change in my community by mentoring young people twice a week.

To this day that mission has not changed. Currently, I mentor youth that are locked up in the San Francisco’s Youth Guidance Center (YGC), and volunteer twice a week to feed the homeless and assist in distributing resources to San Francisco and Oakland communities. I have assisted in organizing events to take at risk youth to extracurricular activities to expand their horizons; such as rodeo shows, race track events, various sporting events, museums, and many other community involvement ventures.

My continued efforts inspired me to form Both Sides of the Conversation as I saw a need to provide a platform that addresses the issues that are negatively impacting the Black and Brown communities with a focus on changing the narrative. I have first-hand insight into the issues at hand, how to best address these problems, and have developed a trust among community members to influence positive behaviors with an open line of communication and strong participation in our programs.

intro

Jon Henry

Founder

I was raised in San Francisco’s District 10 in Bayview Hunters Point and attended SF Public schools (McAteer High School). After high school, I studied as a Journeymen Heating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Service Mechanic through City College of San Francisco and Local 38’s apprenticeship program.

Growing up, I watched my community endure a number of social challenges as a result of limited resources available. Violence, homelessness, incarceration, and gentrification plagued my neighborhood. At just eighteen years old, I made a conscious decision to help by joining Alive and Free Omega Boys Club and became an activst for my community. For the last twenty-four years, I have committed myself to inspiring change in my community by mentoring young people twice a week.

To this day that mission has not changed. Currently, I mentor youth that are locked up in the San Francisco’s Youth Guidance Center (YGC), and volunteer twice a week to feed the homeless and assist in distributing resources to San Francisco and Oakland communities. I have assisted in organizing events to take at risk youth to extracurricular activities to expand their horizons; such as rodeo shows, race track events, various sporting events, museums, and many other community involvement ventures.

My continued efforts inspired me to form Both Sides of the Conversation as I saw a need to provide a platform that addresses the issues that are negatively impacting the Black and Brown communities with a focus on changing the narrative. I have first-hand insight into the issues at hand, how to best address these problems,and have developed a trust among community members to influence positive behaviors with an open line of communication and strong participation in our programs.

Our Purpose

Both Sides of the Conversation is a 501c3 nonprofit that was created to provide resources through effective conversations that empower our people. Through open dialogue, we explore the challenges and barriers that are faced within our Black and Brown communities to connect, reflect, and develop ways of healing together. We focus on listening and providing resources because we believe all underserved communities have a need for positive change

Commitment

Committed team members who understand the needs of the people and has a heart for making the community better for all.

Leadership

Leaders who encourage hard work, respect for others, and a positive approach to teaching and mentoring others.

Focus

A focus on the individual person to bring about change in their life and of their family.

Resources

Provide resources through impactful dialogue that empowers the Black and Brown communities to become economically self-sufficient.

Partnership

Partnership with community members and leaders to create positive, supportive environments that create racial equity and healing.

Building Wealth

Designed to help individuals become self- sufficient and achieve financial stability through our Financial Literacy, Managing Debt, and Building Generational Wealth programs. Literacy helps them create a realistic roadmap that will take them through their daily lives making sound financial decisions.

Financial literacy empowers people. With any lack of financial education, anything that resembles credit, interest rates, or investments is intimidating and leaves individuals at a disadvantage. We’re not saying you need to be a financial guru, but knowing how interest rates work, the difference between stocks and bonds, and the factors that impact your credit rating, for example, motivate consumers to ask questions and seek out their best options. It also decreases their stress level. When people are well versed in the state of their finances, they have the information they need to take action, modify their investment portfolio, or continue with their current strategy.

This program will work to build financial security in our neighborhoods that foster economic stability and mobility for residents who have historically been excluded or marginalized, and ensure that these neighborhoods benefit from economic growth and vibrancy.

Racial inequity in all aspects of life is widespread and stubbornly persistent in America today. Systems and institutions across the country are failing — still — to provide the opportunities and support necessary for families and children of color to thrive. Our program aims to advance racial equity for American families of color and to determine the structural opportunities and sources of support that can help eliminate financial inequity and help children, young people and families thrive. We will employ data-driven, targeted strategies, programs and resources focused on those children, families and communities who need them most.

Healing

Both Sides of Healing

Planned year-round mentor program that will introduce positive, healing partnerships between young people and specially trained adult mentors who have lived through similar experiences.

BSOTC’s focus is on intervening early in the school-to-prison pipeline, which disproportionately impacts youth who experience various forms of exclusion and marginalization, such as poverty and racism. Youth facing these and other risks are more likely to become disconnected from school and become involved in the juvenile justice system.

Our one-on-one and group mentoring model allows mentors and participants to develop relationships on a more intimate level in a private setting, which may be more conducive to gaining participants’ trust.

Our emphasis is on mentoring young people and helping them navigate the challenges and opportunities of adolescence and life itself.

Jackie Robinson

A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.

Mentors will lead with values that promote well- being and equity. Leadership and staff working with young people have to demonstrate that they believe all youth deserve a happy, healthy and productive future, no matter their race or ethnicity. That includes being aware of how chronic trauma may have affected the lives of youth in systems and responding in appropriate, caring ways that promote healing and resilience.

The intention is for the mentors to have a transformative impact on the individual, family, community and systemic levels. The mentors go beyond de-escalating situations on the streets to actively helping young people build full-fledged life plans that encompass housing, health, positive outlets and more. This often means that the mentors support not just the young person, but their peers, family members and larger support networks, too.

TRANSLATE ᐅ